Showing 7 results

Person/organization
Simon Fraser University Special Collections and Rare Books Corporate body

(f.)Lip Magazine

  • Corporate body
  • 1986-1989

(f.)Lip Magazine, was founded in 1986 and was a quarterly publication of innovative feminist writing, including creative work, essays and reviews. It was co-edited by Sandy (Frances) Duncan, Angela Hryniuk, Erica Hendry and Betsy Warland. The magazine was run out of Vancouver, British Columbia.

Indigenous Media Arts Group

  • Corporate body
  • 1998-2007

The Indigenous Media Arts Group, or IMAG, was a Vancouver based non-profit organization founded in early 1998 to encourage and facilitate the promotion, development and dissemination of Indigenous media, arts and culture. The group grew out of the amalgamation of the First Nations Video Collective and the former First Nations Access Program at Video In Studios. Founding members included Dana Claxton, Cleo Reece, Zachery Longboy, and T’uy’t’tanat-Cease Wyss and membership was comprised of local media makers. IMAG was incorporated under the BC Societies Act on July 19, 1999. IMAG's activities included organizing the IMAGeNation Aboriginal Film and Video Festival, a festival that was held annually in Vancouver from 1998 to 2006, and a traveling film festival that was held in rural communities throughout British Columbia (Prince Rupert, Duncan and Enderby) in 1999 and in 2005. The group also facilitated workshops and training programs in media and arts administration and operated a resource centre for Indigenous people to access information regarding film and video making, media arts, cultural theory and media literacy. IMAG held its first media training program in 2000 and continued to offer training in subsequent years, including themed training programs, such “Healing Hands: Voices of Resistance” and “Repatriation: Returning Home” in 2004-2005. IMAG added a professional media arts training program in 2003 and an After School Media Arts Program in 2005.
IMAG co-sponsored programming events to encourage and facilitate communication, cooperation, and exchange among diverse Indigenous cultural and artistic communities. The group was run by a combination of paid employees and volunteers. IMAG had a board of directors, usually consisting of a group of Indigenous film makers who volunteered at IMAG. The group never received operating funding and functioned from grant to grant. By 2007, key individuals had left the organization and, without an operating grant, the group disbanded the same year.

Women in View Festival

  • Corporate body
  • 1986-1999

The Women in View festival began in 1986 when Jane Heyman, along with Sue Astley, Sharon Bakker, Patricia Ludwick and Suzie Payne created View, the Performing Arts Society, a non-profit organization. The purpose of the organization included promoting the artistic growth of women involved in the performing arts; to provide increased opportunity for women in the performing arts and to encourage the participation of women from diverse cultural background. Between 1986 and 1988, View organized workshops, lectures, and networking sessions for women in the arts in Vancouver. From the beginning, the goal of the organization was to create a festival.
The first Women in View festival was held in Vancouver in 1989, and was a multidisciplinary arts festival showcasing work initiated by women. Over the following 10 years, until 1998, the festival was successful at providing opportunities for over 1,500 women in the performing arts from across Canada and around the world. Following the 10th festival, the board of Women in View faced a deficit of $20,000 and the resignation of 2 key organizers. Unable to gain funding for the 1999 festival, the board decided to cancel the eleventh festival and dissolve View at its annual general meeting in 1999. Women in View’s few assets, and its work, were taken over by La Luna Productions, a collective of professional women artists of colour.

Mother Tongue Publishing

  • Corporate body
  • 1994-

Mother Tongue Publishing is a small independent Canadian publishing company located on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, run by Mona Fertig and Peter Haase. Mother Tongue publishes books of B.C. fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction, and the series, The Unheralded Artists of BC, dedicated to recognizing forgotten 20th century B.C. artists (1900s-1960s). Mother Tongue started as a small international literary periodical. From 1994 until around 2008, Mother Tongue Press published letterpress limited edition books and broadsides of poetry by Stephanie Bolster, Lorna Crozier, Kate Braid, Cathy Ford, Maxine Gadd, Shirley Graham, Penn Kemp, Robert Kroetsch, Sylvia Legris, Peter Levitt, Sandi Frances Duncan, Patricia Young, Daphne Marlatt, Susan McCaslin, P.K. Page, Murray Reiss, Nadine Shelly, Peter Such and Phyllis Webb. The publications employed handmade endpaper, beautiful cover stock, recycled paper, embossing, letterpress printing, handsewing, non-adhesive binding, and tipped in photographs of paintings. Mother Tongue Press also held book art, letter press and writing workshops, and organized book launches and readings. In 2008, Mother Tongue Press expanded and entered trade publishing as Mother Tongue Publishing.

Valhalla Wilderness Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

Valhalla Wilderness Society (VWS) was founded in 1975, in New Denver, British Columbia; it achieved park status for what is now Valhalla Provincial Park in 1983. VWS went on to successfully spearhead campaigns for the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary, Goat Range Provincial Park, and the Spirit Bear Conservancies on Princess Royal Island. VWS also played one of the key roles in the protection of South Moresby National Park Reserve (Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve on Haida Gwaii). Its Endangered Wilderness Map of 1988 helped to spark the movement to double BC’s park system to 12% of the province. Valhalla has led park campaigns for over 560,000 hectares of now protected land.

Rattler

  • Corporate body
  • 1982-1987

Rattler was an experimental multimedia and poetry zine published between 1982 and 1987 in Hollywood, California. Heather Haley was the editor and publisher for all four issues, along with Peter Haskell, who is listed as associate editor for the first issue, and co-editor for the second and fourth issue. Haley stated that she wanted to produce a zine with presence and style, something that would make poetry accessible and readable.

Nunaga Publishing Company Ltd.

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-1980

The Nunaga Publishing Company was formed in 1972 by Rick Antonson, Brian Antonson and Mary Trainer upon the publication of a book they co-wrote, entitled "In Search of a Legend: Slumach’s Gold." Nunaga went on to publish books by other British Columbia authors, including "New Westminster: The Early Years" by Alan Woodland, "British Columbia Canoe Routes" by Canoe Sport BC, and "Highrise Horticulture: A Guide to Gardening in Small Spaces" by David Tarrant. Nunaga became a registered limited company in 1974. Rick Antonson was director and president, Mary Trainer was director and treasurer, and Brian Antonson was director and secretary. Nunaga purchased the rights to "Canadian Frontier Magazine" in 1974, and published the "Canadian Frontier Annual" from 1976-1978. The company’s Canadian sales representatives were McIntyre and Stanton in the West, and Belford Books in the East.

Nunaga changed its name to Antonson Publishing in 1977; that same year, Mary Trainer resigned as director. Under the name Antonson Publishing, the company continued to publish nonfiction books including "Vancouver Defended: History of the Men and Guns of the Lower Mainland Defences, 1859-1949" by Peter Moogk, and "Prison Doctor" by Guy Richmond. Over eight years, Nunaga/Antonson published twenty-five titles. In 1980, Antonson Publishing sold the rights to and backlist stock of its books to Douglas & McIntyre (D&M) and wound up its publishing activities. After the sale, Rick Antonson became Vice President and General Manager of Douglas & McIntyre. He left publishing to work in BC’s tourism industry in the mid-1980s, but remained a member of D&M’s board of directors into the mid-2000s.