Showing 76 results

Person/organization
Simon Fraser University Archives and Records Management Department

Ellis, John F.

  • Person

John Ellis came to SFU as a charter faculty member in the Faculty of Education. He received his Ed.D degree from the University of California at Berkeley and had a twenty-year career in public education before joining the University to direct the Professional Foundations Program. He served as temporary acting president of SFU for four days following the resignation of Patrick McTaggart-Cowan in May 1968.

In November of that year, a series of protests against Simon Fraser University's admissions policies and inconsistent accreditation for courses taken at other institutions culminated in a 65 hour "sit-in" in the University Administration Offices. The University Senate responded by charging Professor Ellis with the responsibility of "the development of a definitive and comprehensive admissions and standings policy in consultation with an advisory committee..." (Simon Fraser University Senate. Minutes of Meeting held November 20, 1968. Although there was an "advisory committee" named by Senate, the final report is the product of Dr. Ellis' research, reflection and writing. Admissions and Standards: A Suggested Policy was released late March 1969. In June 1969, Senate adopted the recommendations of the report with only minor revisions. The admissions controversy was effectively defused.

The Ellis Report as it was re-titled by the university community, was widely applauded in post-secondary education circles in British Columbia, and played an important role in the development of Simon Fraser University.

Lloyd, Cliff

  • Person

Cliff L. Lloyd was a professor in the Department of Economics and Commerce from 1973 until his sudden death on January 24, 1977. As an experimental economist, he is remembered for his proposed Northern Stores project, an attempt to investigate demand theory (would people buy less of a product if it cost more). For a fuller appreciation of Lloyd's research, see the introductory essays by his SFU colleagues in The Collected Works of Cliff L. Lloyd (F-143-2-0-11).

Canadian Association of Geographers: Western Division

  • Corporate body

The British Columbia Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers came into being in 1958. In 1968 this Division became the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers (WDCAG) and they included members of the parent body from Alberta and the Western States. The purposes of the organization are the promotion of geographical study, teaching and research. The Division holds annual meetings and publishes a newsletter and occasional papers.

Archives and Records Management Department

  • Corporate body
  • 1968 -

The University Archives acquires, preserves and makes available three categories of materials: (1) the official records of the University, including those created by the Board of Governors, Senate, University committees, faculties, departments and administrative offices; (2) materials documenting the wider University community; and (3) historical research collections that promote the teaching and research activities of the University.

The Archives was established within the University Library in 1968 when librarian Liisa Fagerlund was appointed University Archivist on a half-time basis. She continued in this post until 1975 when she left the University. From 1975 to 1978, the Archives functioned within the Special Collections division of the Library. Archival duties were carried out by various library staff members. In 1978, the University Archives was established as a separate administrative unit outside of the Library. Donald Baird, recently retired as University Librarian, became University Archivist and held this position until his retirement in 1990. Jim Ross served as University Archivist from 1991 to 1993, and was succeeded by Ian Forsyth in 1994.

When the Archives was a function of the University Library, the University Archivist reported to the University Librarian. When the Archives was established as a separate administrative unit, the University Archivist reported directly to the University President. The reporting structure changed in 1986 when the University Archivist reported to the Vice-President, Research/Information Systems; in 1990, when the University Archivist reported to the Associate Vice-President, Academic; and in 1996, when the University Archivist reported to the Registrar/Dean of Students.

McPherson, Kathryn

  • Person

In the spring semester 1989, Kathryn McPherson was instructor for Women Studies 202, "History of Women in Canada." As part of the course work, McPherson assigned students to conduct a 2-3 hour interview with a British Columbia woman. Students were encouraged to select a woman over 60 years of age, and the interviewer was responsible for the themes covered. The interviews were recorded and deposited in the Archives.

British Columbia Student Federation

  • Corporate body
  • 1972 -

The British Columbia Assembly of Students (BCAS), formally established in 1966, grew out of a 1965 meeting of delegates from universities, colleges, technical schools, and secondary schools. The students wanted a province-wide forum for the discussion of issues relevant to them.

The BCAS was succeeded in 1969 by the British Columbia Union of Students, which included only university and regional college representatives. This group concentrated on issues such as unemployment, housing, and civil liberties. For example, it established a student employment task force, and produced a lengthy report on the subject.

The BC Union of Students, in turn, was succeeded in 1972 by the British Columbia Association of Student Unions, formed by representatives of 16 student councils across the province. The Association's formal structure was limited; it had no financing, no staff and no central coordination of information. To overcome these limitations, BCASU delegates resolved to restructure the organization. The result was the British Columbia Federation of Students.

In order to join the BCSF, a student organization had to conduct a referendum among its members to join the BCSF on the basis of a per student levy. The BCSF provided a means of communication between different student organizations in order to build support for common interests. An executive met regularly and was advised by a number of committees. As well, the BCSF held semi-annual conferences. The BCSF employed staff members from time to time as well as researchers to collect information on topics such as a dental plan, student housing, daycare, student employment, financial aid, transferability of courses, and the financing of post-secondary institutions.

In 1982, the Simon Fraser Student Society voted to join the Canadian Federation of Students. The BCSF reformed itself as the Canadian Federation of Students---Pacific Region.

Lebowitz, Andrea

  • Person

Andrea Pinto Lebowitz came to Simon Fraser University in 1965 as a charter faculty member in the Department of English. Lebowitz participated in a number of feminist activities including the Women's Caucus. She became the first coordinator of the Women's Studies program and transferred her appointment to the Women's Studies Department in 1997.

Leong, Vivien

  • Person

Vivien Leong graduated from SFU in 1990 with a major in communication. During her time as a student, she was a member of the Recycling Group of the B.C. Public Interest Research Group, and the Communications Student Union. The B.C. PIRG recycling program was the first such effort on campus.

Press Gang Publishers

  • Corporate body
  • 1989 -

Press Gang Publishers was a feminist printing press publishing quality trade paperback books—fiction, non-fiction, poetry and art—primarily by Canadian women authors and artists. Their non-fiction books addressed such social issues as the treatment of women by the mental health system, recovery from childhood sexual abuse, lesbian identity, homophobia and censorship, and women in conflict with the criminal justice system. Press Gang authors won numerous awards for their work.

Press Gang Publishers evolved from a feminist printing and publishing collective of the same name. The original Press Gang was a small collective of men and women who incorporated under British Columbia's Companies Act as Press Gang Publishers Ltd. in April 1970. By 1974, the collective had become a women-only, feminist and anti-capitalist printshop, with paid and volunteer workers.

Press Gang published its first book under its own imprint in 1976, a collection of essays entitled "Women Look at Psychiatry." Over the years, printing and publishing activities increasingly diverged, and in 1982 Press Gang established a separate collective to manage the publishing operations. In 1989 the separation was completed when the two collectives formally became distinct legal and corporate entities, Press Gang Printers Ltd. and Press Gang Publishers Feminist Cooperative. The two organizations, however, remained closely associated. In 1993 Press Gang Printers ceased to exist due to economic pressues in the printing trade and on their clientele (grassroots, community organizations).

Full-time staff members of Press Gang Publishers included managing editor Barbara Kuhne; financial manager Della McCreary; and art director/production manager Val Speidel. Paula Clancy and Nancy Pollak also served on the Press Gang Board.

Because of changes in the book publishing industry and the book selling marketplace, smaller publishers such as Press Gang faced difficult times. In 2000, Press Gang formed an alliance with Polestar Publishers of Victoria and issued a joint catalogue. Shortly thereafter, Polestar was purchased by Raincoast Books. In 2002, Press Gang Publishers declared bankruptcy after thirty years as a major independent feminist publisher. Some of their titles are still distributed by Raincoast Books and by Lazara Press.

Wilson, Lolita

  • Person

Lolita Wilson came to Simon Fraser University in August 1965 as Dean of Women and Associate Professor of Psychology. She subsequently served in a number of positions at the University including Acting Registrar, Dean of Student Affairs, and Assistant to the Vice-President, Academic. She retired from SFU in 1978.

Garland, Iris

  • Person
  • 23 June 1935 - 29 October 2002

Iris Lillian Garland (1935-2002) taught dance from the University’s inception to her retirement as Professor Emeritus from the School for the Contemporary Arts (SCA) in 2000. As a charter member of SFU, Garland established and was involved in the growth of the contemporary dance program, which began as components of the Recreational Program in the Faculty of Education, and ultimately grew to become an academic degree program in the SCA.

Garland was born on June 23, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois. She earned a BS in 1957 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she majored in physical education and graduated in the top three percent of her class. She went on to earn her MSc in 1960 at the University of California at Los Angeles. Garland spent the next five years as an instructor in physical education at the University of North Dakota and then the University of Washington, before joining SFU as an instructor in the Physical Development Centre of the Faculty of Education in September 1965. It was at SFU that Garland also met her husband, James Warren Felter, who served as the first Curator/Director of the Simon Fraser Gallery.

Early on, Garland was an outspoken supporter of the creation of an academic unit offering credit courses and programs in the fine and performing arts at SFU. Meanwhile, she grew the contemporary dance program from its humble beginnings within the Faculty of Education into workshops and intensives offered through Kinesiology and a fledgling Centre for Communications and the Arts, bolstered by guest performers and artists in residence as instructors. With the establishment of the Centre for the Arts in 1975, dance was ultimately elevated from non-credit workshops to credit courses alongside those in film, music, theatre, visual arts, and art history. Garland’s continued efforts helped to establish an academic dance minor program in 1976, and a dance major program by 1980. After the Centre became the School for the Contemporary Arts in 1989, dance became an academic BFA degree program and part of an interdisciplinary MFA offered by the SCA.

Throughout her career, Garland continued her dance education, pursuing studies in modern, dance notation, and a voice intensive in theatre. She also studied ballet under Mary Ann Wells in Seattle and Mara McBirney in Vancouver. In 1983, at the University of Washington, she became a Certified Movement Analyst, a program incorporating Laban Movement Analysis, which Garland went on to feature in her teaching. A significant contribution to her teaching was the creation of the unique telelearning course, “Dancing in Cyberspace: Creating with the Virtual Body,” which she co-developed in the 1990s with Lisa Marie Naugle, a PhD student from New York University. The course was offered through SFU's Centre for Distance Education and utilized Life Forms, a software program developed by Dr. Thomas W. Calvert in the SFU Computing Science Department. Life Forms allowed for the study and choreography of animated human figures in dance and movement. The course was popular with distant education SFU students, as well as national and international learners. In 1998, Garland was invited to present “New Technologies for Choreographers: Life Forms Workshop and Seminar” to professional choreographers in Sydney, Australia.

Garland was popular with her superiors, colleagues, and students alike, and commended often for her hard work and dedication not only to the University, but also to the dance community as a whole both locally and nationally. In 1991, she was awarded SFU Teacher of the Year. In addition to her teaching, Garland served on multiple departmental and university committees throughout her SFU career. Within the dance community, Garland participated as an independent choreographer and performer at various dance festivals and concerts, first in the 1970s through the Burnaby Mountain Dance Company, which was originally formed with SFU dancers in 1973. She later showcased her work through the Off-Centre Dance Company, which began in 1985 under the direction of various SFU dance faculty and later absorbed into the SFU dance program to provide advanced students an opportunity to be part of an ensemble and perform publicly. From the late 1980s into the 1990s, Garland featured her work at Vancouver’s Dancing on the Edge Festival of Contemporary Dance, an event which continues today. At the national level, Garland was heavily involved with the Dance in Canada Association as a member of the board in the 1970s and as a conference organizer into the 1980s. Her dedication to the Association earned her an Outstanding Service Award in 1985.

In addition to her main research interests in early modern dance history, dance and technology, and dance analysis and choreography, Garland developed an interest in Spanish dancer Tórtola Valencia (1882-1955). She began researching the life of this early modern dancer in earnest, travelling to Spain to conduct further study, and presenting several conference papers on the topic in the 1990s. Garland had begun writing a biography of Tórtola Valencia when she was diagnosed with cancer in early 2002. She passed away in North Vancouver, BC, on October 29, 2002.

Learning and Instructional Development Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1967–2011

The Learning and Instruction Development Centre (LIDC) was a service unit that provided in-classroom technical assistance and support; worked with SFU departments to create multimedia educational productions (photographs, sound recordings, film and video); and offered training programs in new instructional techniques and methods.

LIDC had its origins in the Audio Visual Centre established in the Library in 1967. Headed by Walter Griba from 1967 to 1993, the AV Centre became an independent unit in 1973. It was renamed the Instructional Media Centre (IMC) in 1981, then LIDC in 2001. For most of its history, the unit reported to the VP Academic portfolio, with a short period (1986-1991) during which it was part of the VP Research group.

In 2010-11, LIDC was reorganized and its two core functions were separated out to two new units: the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC), focussed on instructional support services; and Creative Services, focussed on the creation of multimedia works supporting or highlighting SFU teaching, research, and programs. In 2014 Creative Services was renamed Creative Studio and became part of University Communications and Marketing.

Name history:

  • Audio Visual Centre (1967-1981)
  • Instructional Media Centre (1981-2001)
  • Learning and Instructional Media Centre (2001-2011)

Chief officers:

  • Walter Griba, Coordinator (1967-1973), Director (1973-1993)
  • T. Greenwood, Director (1993-2000)
  • William Glackman, Acting Director (2000-2001)
  • David Kaufman, Director (2001-2008)

Successor bodies:

  • Teaching and Learning Centre
  • Creative Services / Creative Studio in University Communications and Marketing

For a visual representation of LIDC's administrative history data, see the appendix in the pdf finding aid for F-18, Learning Instructional Development Centre fonds.

Hobler, Philip M.

  • Person
  • 1936 - 2006

Philip Hobler was a professor of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University (SFU), who was appointed from 1967 to 2001. For many years, he captained the SFU archaeological research vessel Sisiutil, which was launched in 1972 and used yearly for summer fieldwork until 1992. Hobler worked at various archaeological sites in Egypt, Fiji, the United States, the Northwest Territories, and on the west coast of British Columbia. His work primarily focused on archaeological sites within Nuxalk Nation territory; From 1987 to 1990, he directed the Bella Coola Villages Project, where excavations were conducted at the Nusqualst, Qwliuth, and Snxlhh village sites.

Other projects direct by Hobler took place along the Stikine River, around Moresby Island in Haida Gwaii, around northern Vancouver Island, on the Southern Gulf Islands, at Fort McLoughlin, at Barkerville’s Chinatown, and on the Snare River and Kakisa Lake in the North West Territories.

Dr. Hobler passed away on July 19, 2006.

Simon Fraser Student Society

  • Corporate body

The Simon Fraser University Society (SFUSS) was established on October 5, 1965. "University" was later dropped and it is now known as the Simon Fraser Student Society (SFSS). The SFSS still maintains its original constitutional objectives: "to promote, direct, administer, coordinate all student activities of, by and for the students of Simon Fraser University, and to promote cooperation amongst the students of Simon Fraser University and cooperation between the members of the Society and students within the Province and elsewhere." Its mandate has come to include advocating for students rights and providing services to graduate and undergraduate members. These include advocacy services, such as Legal Aid and Women's Centre, and retail services, such as Quad Books, the Print Shop and the Pub.

In its first year, the Society organized social events, co-sponsored Vietnam teach-ins, started a co-op bookstore, and protested against the poor quality food offered on campus. In the 1970s, the Society organized against tuition fee increases, lobbied for improved on-campus housing, started a women's centre, and opened a student-run pub. The 1980s saw the development of plans for a student union building and a continuation in the struggle for affordable education. In the 1990s the Society has constructed the Maggie Benston Centre, expanded its services and continues to advocate on behalf of students for accessible, affordable education.

The Executive Council originally consisted of 14 elected officers: President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Ombudsman, Clubs Director, Public Relations Officer, Arts, Science and Education Presidents, Athletics Coordinator, Social Convenor, Cultural Director, and Housing coordinator. This remained until 1977 when changes to constitutional by laws established five at large positions: President, Treasurer, External and Internal Relations Officers, Secretary, and Public Relations Officer and the Ombuds Office. Currently, six elected Executive officers and 36 Student Union representatives elected by students from each academic department sit on the Forum, the student representative body responsible for all major Student Society decisions. The Departmental Student Unions and Standing Committees supply information and recommendations to the Forum. Student Society Standing Committees deal with every aspect of the Society's operations.

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